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Why Naija Music Will Never Be Mainstream In America

Yes, you read the title right, I’m not jonzing you. Naija Music will never go mainstream in America (and by mainstream I mean like Estelle mainstream). Now, before you cyber crucify me for making such a bold statement, please read the full article (and maybe take a deep breath and step away from the computer for a few minutes if you’re really vexing).

Here are 3 reasons why Naija Music will NOT go mainstream in the US:

1. Artistes sing in languages and use phrases and terminology unfamiliar to most Americans

This is probably the most obvious reason. Most Naija Musicians sing with a mix of English and Pidgin. A large number of popular Naija Music artistes also sing in their native language which is completely foreign to most Americans.

For Africans “who dey hear pidgin well well” it's hard to put yourself in the position of someone “who no sabi am at all”. For someone who has never heard this language and doesn't understand the basis of it, it literally sounds like you're speaking gibberish.

2. African culture holds very little influence in America

Unlike Hispanic culture, African (particularly Nigerian) culture holds little to no relevance or influence in American culture which is just another barrier to the acceptance of Naija Music on a mainstream level.

In America, the Hispanic population (people of Central and South American origin) is the largest minority population in America  which means that not only does this population surpass the amount of black people in America; it is a group that holds a large amount of cultural influence. Extensive exposure to Hispanic culture and language made it easier for Reggaeton to become mainstreamly popular in America.

3. Generally speaking, Africa as a whole carries a negative connotation in America

How many times have you heard stories or seen black Americans denounce their African lineage? These people would rather embrace their slave background than attempt to identify with African culture. For most Americans, Africa is a poor "country" filled with people who live in huts and have no access to clean water or electricity (thanks to the media).

Regardless of the fact that it's totally false, this is still the vague perception of Africa within America which prevents African artistes from making a connection with their American audience because they will be seen in such a light.

But aren't there a lot of internationally recognised Naija Music artistes already?

Yes, however MOST of the people outside of Africa that listen to Naija Music and attend shows are Africans living in those countries or first/ second generation immigrant children who have African parents which therefore means that the culture is not entirely foreign to them.

What about G.O.O.D Music signing Don Jazzy & D'Banj?

Well, until we see what that collaboration produces, we can't use it as an indicator to gauge how well Naija Music will be received in America. Kanye West has done collaborations with other International artistes trying to make their way into the American market with no success (more on that later) and even the song "Lift Off" Don Jazzy co-produced for Jay-Z & Kanye's new album did not have a typical Naija Music feel to it so I'm eager to see how they will infuse Naija style into G.O.O.D Music.

IMPORTANT: Naija Music is not the only international style that's trying to crossover to the American market. In Asia, "KPop" otherwise known as Korean pop music along with JPop(Japan) and CPop(China) have been attempting this for the past few years. Korean pop music is essentially the Asian equivalent of Nigerian Music in terms of popularity across their continents of origin.

Some of these Asian artistes have done collaborations with American entertainers like Lil’ Kim and Kanye West in addition to collaborating with American producers to release songs that would appeal more to the American market. Despite this and other forms of exposure within America, KPop singers still haven't managed to crossover on a mainstream level and you wanna know why?

Because the cultural barrier is too large. Just like Naija Music artistes, KPop musicians sing in foreign languages mixed with English and exude aspects of Asian culture that Americans can't relate to.

And FYI, just like some Naija artistes (M.I, PSquare, & Tuface), some KPop artistes were also profiled on the Wendy Williams show and other American talk shows; one of them even went on tour as an opening act for the Jonas brothers. Again, we're not the only ones trying to make it in America.

The interesting thing about all of these American TV appearances is that instead of warming these artistes up to the American audience, it actually just increases the artiste’s profile and popularity within their original fan base.

A Few Words about Nneka & Asa

Both of these women are extremely talented, internationally recognized Nigerian artistes. HOWEVER, they are an exception to the typical Naija artiste gaining worldwide attention.

Asa: Asa spent a large part of her childhood in Lagos but, she did not get international musical recognition until she returned to France (her birthplace). Asa is described as a ‘Nigerian-French singer’ whose style is soul and jazz. She is signed to an independent European label which technically makes her a European artist whose musical style is influenced by Nigerian culture. Many of Asa’s concerts and interviews are in French and in many cases she is internationally recognized as a European artist.

Nneka:   Similar to Asa, although Nneka grew up in Nigeria, her musical career grew out of Europe. Nneka is also signed to a European/ international label which means that although she is African, she is also considered to be a European Artist. Nneka’s international recognition grew out of Hamburg, Germany and spread to other parts of Europe. Her sound is described as “soul, hip hop, R n B, Afrobeat, Reggae and Jangle Pop”.

The main points to realize about Asa and Nneka’s careers are that although they are African and sing with Naija influence in their music, their musical careers did not develop in Nigeria, they are not signed to Nigerian Labels and therefore cannot be categorized as typical Naija artistes.

So, If I don’t think Naija Music will go mainstream what DO I think is going to happen?

Well, a few things actually:

1. It's possible we will see/hear an influence of Naija Music in some American songs that may or may not become mainstream. Depending on what artiste and producer creates the tracks and how well it’s done will determine the level of success the influence of Naija Music will have in American pop music.

2. Other Naija Music artistes may get signed to major American labels. To make their sound sell in America, the artiste’s style will be a watered down version of the typical Naija sound.

3. The quality of Naija music will continue to improve and new superstar artistes will emerge.

Final Thoughts: African artistes should continue making music that cater to the tastes of their true fans, people who not only enjoy listening and dancing to their music but who also understand and appreciate the culture behind the music.

**BREAKING** Did anyone see the Naija Cypher on the BET Hip Hop Awards tonight?! No??... Oh, me neither, I guess that proves my point.

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Oscarmedia
8 years ago

Ahh this is rubbish joor loool i joke very good article sha

dili
dili
8 years ago

bullshit

Banko
Banko
8 years ago

Haha Miss AJ... Wait till tha A.P.P.E movement steps on da scene....We goin 4 mainstream America for Impossible is nothing

AJCiti
8 years ago
Reply to  Banko

Chief!

Banko
Banko
8 years ago

Nice article by the way MissAJ... well said and thats just simply the truth about the current situation in Nigerian music today

Anogie
Anogie
8 years ago

I must say there is some element of truth in this article, however, I think one thing that i find interesting is the fact that most non-nigerian africans tend to really enjoy nigerian music. Any comments?

Awizle
Awizle
8 years ago

yea ummmmmm good article but i still think it depends on how good the artist is. i dont totally agree. for example wande coal, banky w, Waje, Muna, M.I, Ice prince would flow well with any foreign beat or artist UNLIKE Durella, Konga, even D banj. So like i said it depends but who gives a FUCK. They still repping we go 2 any club now all we wna hear, dance to is Niger music..............it makes us happy.

ayott
ayott
8 years ago

this is very very true to be frank and honest cause most African artist (or better yet artist with African genes) that have gone international did not start their music in Africa and have close to zero influence of Africa in their music like mohombi- congo ,taio cruz, asa ,etc. and really africa did not contribute to where they are in their careers. but @AJCiti its no completely impossible we just need that artist with that global appeal and sound and also very good labels with strong international backing from major labels. My reason for this is ::in the last… Read more »

@na_omi26
8 years ago

Alot of people are going to disagree with this article but at the end of the day that is the 'bitter' truth.That said,i don't think breaking into the Mainstream American market should be d main priority of our Nigerian artistes cos everyone seems to be walking in that lane now, of course i'm not saying that is a bad thing but we all need to appreciate ourselves 1st and not make pleasing other people what makes us feel good.Music is a universal language,our artistes only need to work harder on pleasing d fans back home (where their major fan base… Read more »

john
john
8 years ago

true talk keep it up

@unbeaten_49
8 years ago

Nice article by the way, with some element of truth also, but the aforementioned Asa sang some of her songs in yoruba, interview or concert in French seems not to matter, as the songs take her to the interview and concerts. The mention of pidgin or vernacular in the songs as barrier for Americans hold no water, the name Awilo Longomba rings any bell, widely known, many danced to the music, but not many understand whatever he was singing. Many spanish, Pueto Rican, and Mexican singers made it in America with their vernacular. African Cultures have no influence in America?… Read more »

@unbeaten_49
8 years ago

current situation? I sigh

opinion
opinion
8 years ago

Its more about americans being into only their own music. The same way the whole world should concentrate on their own music and stop trying to make it in america. The mentality that american must accept ur music b4 u are global should be killed.

Phalaenopsis
Phalaenopsis
8 years ago

AJ You are so right..... But I am going to add just a little thing, 'Never say Never' with NIger. There is nothing we can't do. THe whole world sabi us. We dey sell drugs well well for the streets of Europe, our girls dem dey stand for streets everywhere for evening dey pursue customers, if we say we wan carry bomb enter plane, we go do am-even if say we go put am for pants!!!!! Our young people start music and within a space of ten years we are almost taking over Africa! Within this short period, Niger don… Read more »

jeffbryan
jeffbryan
8 years ago

ok their seems to be a lot of truth in these article but i think the whole cause of these is due to nigerians that live in america, they don't promote the nigerian culture like the mexicans or other hispanics community in america does. the way nigerians in england promote our culture has made it possible for most nigerian artist to go out there and have a good show. so until we start promoting and appreciating our culture ourselves then the americans wouldn't either. it has nothing to do with language barrier, no one knows what pitbull says but yet… Read more »

ABBA FATHER
ABBA FATHER
8 years ago

who ever thought Dbanj would be on the same stage with kanye...2face in the studio with Mary j,..i think music has no language if you song is good then its good...we didn't hear what awilo was saying yes we danced to it.cabo snoop of Angola no one understand a word of what he is saying yes that's about the bigest jam of this year..even fat joe did a remix of WINDECK..the opening song for France 98 world cup the opening song was done by a Senegalese man...must me sound like them for our music to be appreciate? do Jamaican try… Read more »

DNA
DNA
8 years ago

A lovely article and well analyzed. However i tend to disagree, as regards to Asa, being an European Artist. I agree she has an international label and could make her get recognized as such, but please, her first album "Asa" was mainly sang in her native language( Yoruba) . Lets tell ourselves the truth, they dont understand Yoruba in Europe, so what does that make her? Asa is the silver lining in the Nigerian crossover quest and other artistes planning such should think of things they can learn from her success to make our beloved Entertainment Industry Bigger. Lovely Article… Read more »

SB_01
SB_01
8 years ago
Reply to  DNA

"her first album "Asa" was mainly sang in her native language( Yoruba)? Come on, Only 'Awe' and 'Eye Adaba' were mainly Yoruba. 'Peace' only had little yoruba too, 'Bibanke' had yoruba chorus. Jailor had little pidgin at the end. So your claim is totally unfounded. Asa is so lyrically sound that when a non-yoruba hears the yoruba parts, they sound just as good as the ones in English.

@iKillCuriosity
8 years ago

I'm surprised you got only three comments on this but, let's see... First I'll attempt to cite examples that defeat your points outright... 1. Shakira, Shaggy, Celine Dion That should defeat your first point easily. They all started singing with non-US influences on their music, but even a totally different language in some cases. What happens is a no-brainer, they get into the US, tweak their music, keep the spine that got them famous in the first place and the rest is history. Celine Dion famously learnt most of her English in two days, just as she was about to… Read more »

@unbeaten_49
8 years ago

good points and true

melvitto
melvitto
8 years ago
Reply to  @unbeaten_49

your first point is stupid celion dion is a pop, shakira sings in english in america, shaggy does reggae..the type of music they make was already prominent in america before them your 3rd point, how do u compare nigeria to brooklyn, you have a country that is know for being corrupt to a BOROUGH that has crime just like any other state in american he's saying that they are european artist not american that why they havent crossed over American Music Industry is the HARDEST IN THE WORLD TO MAKE IT IN, one day your hot the next day your… Read more »

whoyoubesef
whoyoubesef
8 years ago

omo, u r 3 much...

darry
darry
8 years ago

Can you tell me which fans where at the sellouts at indigo 02 in greenwich? i'll give u the answer.. mainly Nigerians and few africans in diaspora.. i live and work as a promoter here in the uk, so i know how this works.. it won't have happened 20yrs ago, yes but now there are more nigerians in diaspora than 20yrs ago.. so do't say because there was a sellout in indigo nigerian music is gonna go mainstream that's out of point find some other point.

@iKillCuriosity
8 years ago
Reply to  darry

My point stands, if there are more Nigerians in the UK, they have a greater influence on the charts. Record labels and the radio realise that there is an untapped demographic they have to cater to. That acceptance will grow. Bigger picture.

Therapist
Therapist
8 years ago

Preach on my brother...your mama born pikin...lol

Adekunle Owolabi
8 years ago

I like the article.
I think it has to do with other things as well.
Look at the following artists, Baaba Maal, Habib Koite, Ladysmith Mambazo, Angelique Kidjo, Freshly Ground, Lira, Amadou & Miriam. Can you spot the difference between these acts and our Nigerian Artistes?

Tmonei
Tmonei
8 years ago

this is an article written by a mind plagued with inferiority complex and a very myopic at that.....the only example that comes to mind is REGGEA MuSIC....there is really not much difference between jamaican patois and nigerian pidgin english, how come reggea is widely accepted in US...Naija sound is already a success in the UK and that success can be replicated in the US as well through good marketing perseverance...inviting us to BET cypher is a start..

The article is silly at best..

Ornell Paul
Ornell Paul
3 years ago
Reply to  Tmonei

She Ain't Myopic And She Don't Gat No Inferiority Complex! She Was Speaking The Truth.. So Stop Insulting! And Don't Yell At Her!

mrL
mrL
8 years ago

Well.....what I think is that once Nigerian artists are more original and don't necessarily copy the form of American culture, we would definitely have a chance. Nas had a sample of Fela's 'Na Poi' on his song with Alicia Keys, he also had another sample from Amadou and Mariam's 'Samabli' song (they are from Mali) on his song 'Patience with Damien Marley. Remember Jay-z and Punjabi MC from India?? I mean look at the FELA on Broadway show, it has become one of the biggest musical shows ever, winning countless awards. So to be honest African music would eventually become… Read more »

@starboybibi
8 years ago

its our culture who wants it to be a mainstream anyway mtsewwww.

iamsodigital
iamsodigital
8 years ago

This article is very very un-informed and very poor! I will save this for the next decade and prove to you how false you were!

What you define as barrier doesn't exist no more! Even culture hasn't started.
Nigerian Music hasn't started!

Sam
Sam
8 years ago

The articles is a bit flawed but IT IS GENERALLY TRUE. I live in America and Nigerian music will never be mainstream here. All the people that disagree and cite examples dont understand anything. Tuface's International version was not bought by white people. Asa's music has been released in the US but only Africans buy it still. People mentioning Awilo are kinda funny. That Nigerian's accept any music dont mean Americans will. Nigerian artists will continue doing collabos, selling out shows abroad to Nigerians and even appearing on TV once in a while but AJ said and i agree they… Read more »

tolu just sayin
tolu just sayin
8 years ago

Notjustok is funny sha talking americans not repping naija ......... how many upcoming artists songs have u screened by not putting or posting them on ur site!........u see there is politics everywhere

etty
etty
8 years ago

True buh u never know

Womenclothingfashion
8 years ago

it's a wonderful article, please continue post the interesting writing! thank you.

Club X eMagazine
8 years ago

a lot to think about here...

Rayz
Rayz
8 years ago

yoo pls use ur head before u write down these article, Sean Paul, beenie man, pit bull, Damian Marley just to list a few have gone mainstream for Gods sakes these's are Jamaican dance hall and south american artiste who most of the time speak their language when singing. like serzly probably u just like moving backwards and nobody wants that.

mel
mel
8 years ago

It is all about the music. It is all about the music. FELA! FELA! FELA! FELA! If you have any white friend on facebook who lives in North America, you'll see how much they bump to Fela. The other Nigerian artist in our generation is mmmeeehhhh... (just there, nothing special)... If every artist in Nigeria will work hard to make music that is as good, if not better than Fela's music, Nigeria will take over the world. I say that without blinking. Fela was on broadway, won a Emmy. Who knows how long before the producers of FELA (Will Smith,… Read more »

_h2o
_h2o
8 years ago
Reply to  mel

Fela was/is popular in America because no American does what he did, and in doing what nobody did, he was radical about the Nigerian plight. Same goes for Bob Marley, how many Americans do you know singing reggae or afrobeat....America is protective of the American interest, you would have to break their arms for them to willingly give the spotlight to a foreigner when they have their one people. If they let us in in hiphop, the African American stand a risk of losing their crowd should be attract the audience to our style, same with R n B, the… Read more »

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
8 years ago

one thing i have realized as an artist living abroad is that when u have another language u are fluent in most ppl in that country gravitate towards you think about it its like living in Canada and bieng bilingual you will always have the edge over someone who only speaks english so at the end of the day forget US or euroupe just be yourself and do what you do best with hard work and a team with solid infrastructure (a little bit of luck too lol) theres no telling where one"s music can go

Ena
Ena
8 years ago

Great Article and also great reply by @ikillcuriousity. A lot of discussants concentrated on Asa being or not being "African". That is besides the point because she is still not mainstream and neither are the more popular Angelique Kidgo and Salif Keita and Baba maal...except I am getting the meaning of mainstream wrong. Seal, Sade Adu, Tunde Bayero of Lighthouse, Lemar, are mainstream artistes. Sade Adu is highest selling British female ever and she is of Nigerian descent. But I have never heard her credit Nigeria nor have I really seen the Nigerian influence in her music. I distinctly remember… Read more »

jayhit
jayhit
8 years ago

Forget that Nigerian is make waves and you think its making everywhere in the world? never!!! only in some places where they have Nigerians. America music is worldwide, mega hot everywhere you will hear it. who ever thinks Nigerian music will take over America, that person is stupid for thinking that way. thats like saying Nigerian home video sh** will take over the America movies

_h2o
_h2o
8 years ago

I agree with you to a certain extent, but disagree with you on two things, your classification of Asa and Nneka. First I'll start with Asa (brace yourselves this might be a long post). Happy reading if you dare 🙂 Asa, though signed to an European label is very much a Nigerian artist, her entire first album was produced by my friend Cobhams and was significantly in her mother tongue, she just isn't based in Nigeria. Being signed to an European label affords her two things, access to an organized industry so much so its process is almost mechanical. Secondly,… Read more »

_h2o
_h2o
8 years ago

Now for Nneka. like Asa, Nneka has an appeal in the music, it is live performance friendly, thus her huge indie performance venues, but how did those venues get to be packed u ask, well simple. Nneka has been recognized for her lyrics and often they are likened to Fela, now that sounds great, but then when you realize that the Fela topics they refer to talk about corruption in Nigeria, the system of chaos, it quickly become clear that they also enjoy the reaffirmation of a decaying Africa, the one always striving for hope, couple that with her bohemian… Read more »

'Deolu Bubbles
8 years ago

Nice article but you should also know that nothing is cast in stone, for Europe its all about the melody, techno sort of tracks, lady gaga, black eyed pea type thingy sells for me, a typical example of that here is Oliver Twist by D'banj and Higher by Eldee....it will get there, and for people like M.I, Wizkid,Wande coal, i think they have a good chance of making it globally, the same reason why we enjoyed Awilo and Magic system will take them global, the time this will happen, i cant say but it cant be ruled out totally

hlexzy
hlexzy
8 years ago

Stop contradicting yourself @ whoever wrote this article! @What about G.O.O.D Music signing Don Jazzy & D’Banj?

Well, until we see what that collaboration produces, we can’t use it as an indicator to gauge how well Naija Music will be received in America.

You should have wait and hear the collabo before jumping into conclusion.You sounded like Reuben Abati. just because you can compose good English does not mean you have good sense of reasoning.

LadyL
LadyL
8 years ago

I agree with this article on some points however the real issue is that not enough Nigerians in the US are supporting Nigerian Artists. Look on FB and Twitter. 80% of Nigerian social media support is from Nigeria and countries in Africa. Agree or not, social media following is a gauge on relevance and importance in the US. There are about 20 million Nigerians in the diaspora. This number is significant enough to start positively influencing the image of Nigerians overseas but we are not making enough effort. Most are satisfied with the status quo. At least I am doing… Read more »

hlexzy
hlexzy
8 years ago

Stop contradicting yourself @ whoever wrote this article! @What about G.O.O.D Music signing Don Jazzy & D’Banj? Well, until we see what that collaboration produces, we can’t use it as an indicator to gauge how well Naija Music will be received in America. You should have wait and hear the collabo before jumping into conclusion.You sounded like Reuben Abati. just because you can compose good English does not mean you have good sense of reasoning.let me tell you this @ Johm F Kennedy Airport N.Y. i met this guy that happens to be a white Dude in 2009, when we… Read more »

jay
jay
8 years ago

i sincerely dislike dis article and i best believe d writer shuld quit .........its filled wit negativity and only expresses mediocrity on the part of notjustok......who says naija music cnt be mainstream?.....dnt forget that music is universal.....nonsense points made.....wt effort have u done to get our music mainstream....downsetters.

Gbryte Femi
8 years ago

i have learnt here.really, thanks for the article its a simple wake up call

_h2o
_h2o
8 years ago

Fela was/is popular in America because no American does what he did, and in doing what nobody did, he was radical about the Nigerian plight. Same goes for Bob Marley, how many Americans do you know singing reggae or afrobeat....America is protective of the American interest, you would have to break their arms for them to willingly give the spotlight to a foreigner when they have their one people. If they let us in in hiphop, the African American stand a risk of losing their crowd should be attract the audience to our style, same with R n B, the… Read more »

Six
Six
8 years ago

I have no problem with the article you wrote, or even the opinion that you stated. But on all levels, the reasons you gave are all incorrect therefore are void. 1.You must be uneducated to think that because there are more hispanic people over here, that it means they have the most influence on the overall population. That is false. African American culture holds way more influence on the majority of the population than any other minority group. Out of all the hispanic countries counted, mexicans make up most of their total tally. Yes, this is an important fact. 2.Because… Read more »

obama2012
obama2012
8 years ago

The writer is of this garbage is a plain idiot... #Nuffsaid !!!

mrL
mrL
8 years ago

Well.....what I think is that once Nigerian artists are more original and don't necessarily copy the form of American culture, we would definitely have a chance. Nas had a sample of Fela's 'Na Poi' on his song with Alicia Keys, he also had another sample from Amadou and Mariam's 'Samabli' song (they are from Mali) on his song 'Patience with Damien Marley. Remember Jay-z and Punjabi MC from India?? I mean look at the FELA on Broadway show, it has become one of the biggest musical shows ever, winning countless awards. So, basically all we need is just originality and… Read more »

Henry
Henry
8 years ago

Anybody who disagrees with this article is a fool PERIOD!! Read the article again nd try to understand what the writing is talking about FOOLS!!

Badjj
Badjj
8 years ago

the thing is that there are over 1billion people in Africa so if Nigerian Music can be able to conquer all of that then that is a great achievement. we have seen that Nigeria can now say they have conquered Africa bcos their music is played all over the continent but do u want to know why? it is because Africans love to dance and since the music is energetic enough to get u dancing, it is accepted. But when it comes to conquering America and other international markets, lets tell ourselves the truth, the quality of Nigerian music is… Read more »

Music Scout
Music Scout
8 years ago

I agree with only the first point simply because there are artists like Gloria Maduka, Rotimi that rep Nigeria in their interviews but do not necessarily sing in Pidgin or local languages 100%. Artists like these are usually not supported in the Nigerian circle even though they are recognized and appreciated almost every where else. We need to embrace artists like this that have the potential to take our beloved Naija music higher.

terry faken
terry faken
8 years ago

helo peeps.would just like to enlighten you about my views regarding this
in regards to point 1.
nigerian musicians have good vocabularies regardless.we have been so infused with english in our subconscious that unknowingly,we SPIT the best metaphors.i have been in uk for a while now and just realising the strong subliminal messages in our song.
i would never stand for it.i believe we are the best and with time,we would definitely make it in america .even though it looks tough.that should not deter us.
all the best.....

Banger Boi!
Banger Boi!
8 years ago

Mel!!!!!!, u made soooo much sense man!, so much!. And its true, NJO could be sooo partial, infact, most of the Nigerian industry is. U've gotta know some1, or have alot of money. Overseas, if u hav a good song, it moves!, coz pple are way more honest there, with no strings attached. why do u think we always hear bout new artist coming up outta yankee, or uk everyday?. But in Naija!!, if u no popular, even if ur song sweet, notin 4 u mehn!, Instead of blogs and radio and media to post a new artists work up,… Read more »

Proprietor Naijamaic
8 years ago

The facts as stated above are true, 1. we don't sing in American language, we sing in Nigerian Language, but then we are nigerian. Artistes sing in languages and use phrases and terminology unfamiliar to most Americans We cannot change our culture to enter a market open to everyone, either love it or don't, most other cultures audience make effort to understand, I don't speak spanish but you can't stop me from doing merengue to many a carribean merengue crooner. 2. African culture holds very little influence in America This is perception and stereotype which is gradually being broken and… Read more »